It’s been almost a month so I figured it was time to update you on my P90x progress. We finished the first phase. It took us an extra two weeks because we decided to redo week 2 and week 4. Between our current house refinance, taxes being due, and a major health hiccup for me, we thought it would be better to just redo those weeks and keep moving.

We really are making this a lifestyle change, though, and not a 90 day program. How so? Even if we take a day off from the nutrition program, it’s never out of our minds. When we eat out or at a friend’s house our portions are far different than they were. We eat more of the protein and vegetables, with some whole grains. And we’re very conscious of how much of the different items are on our plate. This month I got a horrendous sinus infection and wound up needing emergency dental surgery.

Obviously I can’t necessarily jump around, nor should I, being on painkillers and having stitches. When I can’t do a vigorous workout, I still get on the treadmill and walk for my workout equivalent and try and engage in stretching, etc. I have some trips scheduled in the next few months and won’t be able to follow along with the video. This does not mean I’m not working out. I’m making a list of the main moves and will be doing my workout on the road.

But let’s be honest. You just want to know our results, right? We haven’t done measurements or body fat percentage calculations, and we probably won’t until our halfway point. However, my husband has:

  1. toned his abs.
  2. dropped a pant size.
  3. reduced his subjective back pain.
  4. lost seven pounds from a December weigh-in at work.

I have:

  1. toned my abs.
  2. firmed my buttocks to where I have a but, then legs, no longer a single merged object I referred to as “buegs.”
  3. reduced my subjective knee pain.
  4. increased my endurance to the point where I can stay on the treadmill for over an hour.
  5. started to come to terms with my body.

The biggest one for me is the last one. I am a petite person, but lean more towards an athletic build. My grandmother use to refer to me as having “birthing hips.” While I enjoyed a very slight frame for the first five-six years of my marriage, it is not natural or healthy for me. As I’m getting more fit again, I’m remembering all the things I can do when I’m healthy and it’s a good place to be in physically and mentally. Many of the concerns I had are still there, but are becoming less of an issue. It’s a good step to being in the right place to make the life I want to have.

FIFTEEN YEARS OF COURAGE

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I watched someone I love try to slowly destroy herself. I watched her make choices that I could do nothing about, spiral downward, scaring me so badly it felt like my heart was ripping in two. I would think about the danger she was putting herself in and I couldn’t breathe. Then I saw her take one tiny step after another away from the dangers until she was living a completely different life, one of strength, courage, and serenity.

Today is my Aunt Sheri’s 15 year Clean & Sober Birthday. That’s 15 years of taking it one day, one hour, one moment, at a time. My Aunt has said no to drugs and alcohol at least 65,700 times. I didn’t pull this number out of my rear, either. I estimate she has to put these thoughts out of her mind at least a dozen times a day over the course of her sober life.

In the early days she would think about using every minute, and the desire doesn’t go away just because you’ve been sober for a long time; the act of using just isn’t part of her life anymore. Each day she wakes up and makes the decision not to use, not to drink. When adversity arises, she makes the choice to put her sobriety before anything else. It’s an amazing amount of hard work, and she still goes to Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymousmeetings. Clean and sober living isn’t a destination, it’s a journey.

So Auntie, I want to tell you thank you. Thank you for teaching me about courage, about responsibility, and about resilience. Thank you for asking me to join you in group sessions as you were getting sober. I was honored that you trusted me to be there and grateful for the coping skills I learned that helped me to walk my own path away from addiction. Thank you for taking me in and giving me a place to live when I needed it. The choices you made allowed me to have a safe place to be when I needed it.

Thank you for making amends for things you didn’t need to. The size of your heart amazes me. Thank you for loving yourself enough to make these tough choices because if you hadn’t you’d be dead today and losing you would have broken me. Thank you for choosing to be a part of our lives. I love you very much. Happy Birthday. God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.